Category: Regional construction

Be Careful with the Data: February Was Not That Slow

On Friday, the Pittsburgh Business Times ran an article on construction activity in February that quoted Dodge Data & Analytics’ report that a mere $36 million in construction started in that month, The lede was that construction declined 88% year-over-year. (In the interest of full disclosure, I worked for what was formerly the F. W. Dodge Division of McGraw-Hill for 14 years at the beginning of my career.) Given the increased level of activity in the construction market since February 1, this headline and data seemed out of step with reality. I did a few minutes research and found that February was indeed down significantly compared to the same month in 2020, but the conclusion of the article was misleading. That’s not the Business Times’ fault. They are relying on data that is very inaccurate.

The construction market in Pittsburgh is rapidly picking up steam as spring begins. That’s a great indicator for 9-12 months out. The optimism and activity are better than what would have been unexpected just 90 days ago; however, the improved prospects for recovery will do little to improve the prospects for 2021. This year is going to be tougher financially than 2020 because the extreme slowdown in the second and third quarters of last year will be echoed in the first half of 2021. Construction businesses need data to manage 2021 so that they can be best positioned to take advantage of what should be a booming 2022. And bad data is worse than no data.

So here’s the data Tall Timber has from its research of building permits, construction reports, architects, owners, and contractors in the region:

Starts ($M) Variance
February 2020 $370.1
February 2021 $185.5 -49.9%
March 2020 $237.9
March 2021 $354.3 ** 48.9%

** Actual through March 26

The data in February 2020 was a good indication of the health of the market. Projects that were permitted or awarded that month included the $80 million Arsenal 201 apartments, a $5 million Behavioral Health Unit at Ohio Valley General Hospital, $25 million shell building for Krystal Biotech in Findlay Township, The $20 million airport micro-grid, $10 million Kraft Heinz research kitchen renovation, $12 million Heinz Field expansion for the Steelers Pro Shop, and a $16 million slag processing facility at Allegheny Ludlum’s Brackenridge facility. It was cross section of the economy. Of course, that was all about to change. The impact of the pandemic showed up almost immediately, as starts in March (typically a much busier month than February) fell off by 35.7%.

That March decline makes sense now, but at the time, such an immediate slowdown would have seemed unlikely. Bear in mind that our methodology for construction starts seeks to identify when work starts or is about to start. We are not tracking construction put in place, so the mandated shutdowns that followed the outbreak should not have influenced March’s start data. The preconstruction process is lengthy and I would have expected that starts would remain higher for a few months when a downturn began. Such was the jarring nature of COVID-19’s impact on the economy that projects were stopped in their tracks, even if they had already bid. Seeing that data by mid-April 2020 informed me that work was going to decline precipitously in 2020. At that point in time, my forecast for 2020 was for 30% lower start volume; but, as it worked out, the market held up better, falling “only” 17% year-over-year.

On the other side of the coin, the optimism that began to build when vaccines were announced in December 2020 has taken a few months to translate into construction starts. Like in February 2020, the work started over the past 30 days represents what the post-COVID economy may present: $60 million in new industrial properties, including Suncap’s and Northpointe’s developments of over 200,000 square feet; a handful of emerging tech fitouts, including multi-million expansions by Intervala at RIDC Westmoreland and Google at Bakery Square.

Construction companies feel good when their bid boards are full but analysis isn’t about feelings; it’s about data. Bidding is a predictor of activity to come. This coming year will see economic growth that comes in fits and starts. It is easier for executives to make decisions about opportunities if they are able to see February’s activity accurately measured, and the expected gains in March follow suit. Put in the context of the conclusions drawn by the author of the Business Times article, contractors that believe the market is slow because their activity is slow can make incorrect decisions about what and how to bid. The value of accurate data is that you can judge how you are doing against the market, rather than your own observations. To wit, if your company worked primarily in the office market, you might think there were few construction opportunities available in March, but there were plenty, just not in the office market.

I’m not familiar with Dodge’s methodology anymore, other than the fact that they don’t employ local reporters as they once did. Perhaps there will be a revision issued in April that shows the February data was higher or a much higher March that shows that the February data was just a timing issue. Regardless of whether the grossly understated February report changes, be careful about the data you use to measure the market in 2021. It will be a volatile and potentially active year. We already know that pricing is out of kilter, which could create a halting recovery from 2020’s malaise. Perhaps you are going to put your head down and hustle your way through 2021, but if you are the type of businessperson who wants to understand what the market is doing, be careful of the data you use. If it seems like the information isn’t matching your reality, look closer. This is not a year you want to miss the market.

Digesting Economic News for the Pittsburgh Construction Economy

Friday will bring the first jobs report on 2021. The January Employment Situation Summary is expected to show modest job gains. If today’s report on January private payrolls from ADP is an indication, the number of jobs created is likely to be above the consensus estimates. After December’s dip in employment, economists were expecting 49,000 additions to private payrolls in January but ADP reported a bump of 174,000 jobs. First and foremost, that’s good news. The late 2020 surge in infections and hospitalizations that followed the Thanksgiving holiday brought fresh rounds of restrictions and, more important, resulted in people voluntarily avoiding places where people gathered. That was bad news for bars, restaurants, airlines, hotels, etc. A rebound from that suppressed demand was expected and, to the degree the bounce back overshoots expectations, it’s good to have job creation recovering ahead of the vaccination rollout.

Last week, the first reading on GDP for the year was released by the Commerce Department. It showed that output declined by 3.5% in 2020. That estimate will be updated two more times but most economists don’t expect much to change. The decline was the steepest since 1946, when the U.S. was retooling industry from wartime to peacetime production. The disruption to the economy in 1946 was different than the pandemic of 2020, but there are similarities in that the dropoff was caused by non-economic factors. That provides additional optimism about the recovery in 2021, as there was less destruction of wealth and capital after the pandemic hit, which will give fuel to the rebound later this year.

The improving economic conditions match up to the increased levels of activity from tenants in commercial real estate, including a number of large space requirements in the market; and it helps explain the increase in design activity at regional architectural and engineering offices.

The Airport Authority announced some very good news in its Blue Sky email Tuesday. Last year’s delay of the $1.1 billion Terminal Modernization Program allowed architects and engineers time to produce 90% design documents by the end of January. Construction documents will be completed as bid packages are prepared but the construction management team of PJ Dick/Hunt and Turner will be releasing bid packages in March for the next phase, which is the multi-modal transportation center. The terminal project’s progress is good news for the Pittsburgh construction market, which should see another mega project, UPMC’s Heart and Transplant Hospital, get into the market in late 2021. With the proposed billion-dollar modernization of the US Steel Mon Valley Works on hold, these two mega projects will be major job creators in 2022 and beyond.

PIT’s Terminal Modernization Program Ready to Move Ahead

In other construction news, Suncap Property Group is moving ahead rapidly with its two proposed industrial developments. Graycor Construction has started construction on a 278,000 square foot distribution center in Findlay Township. Meridian Design Build will begin work on a 220,000 square foot distribution center – rumored to be for Bayer Healthcare – at the Victory Business Park in Clinton Township, Butler County. Bids will be taken February 5 for Duquesne University’s new osteopathic medical school. Contractors bidding the project are Jendoco, Massaro, PJ Dick, Rycon, and Turner. Construction is not expected to start until end of 2021.

Pittsburgh’s Construction Year in Review: 2020

Construction and development were on a roll coming into 2020. While the economy was certainly showing signs of age, the pipeline of projects to be built had swollen to the point that it appeared that the Pittsburgh construction market would skate through any downturn that might come in 2021 or 2022. Of course, the downturn that materialized 75 days into the new year dashed that idea and laid waste to the economy. By summer, the hopes for a booming 2020 were gone. The human costs and loss of businesses and jobs have been devastating. From the perspective of construction underway and starting in 2020, however, Pittsburgh’s market performed better than feared.

Construction starts recovered stronger than was expected at mid-year. Residential construction was up sharply for single-family homes. New permits for single-family construction rose 12.7 percent year-over-year, to 3,337 new homes. Both single-family detached (2,337 units) and attached homes (1,000 units) saw increases. A steep decline in multi-family starts brought the overall total units started down to 4,138 units, more than 1,000 units off the 2019 pace. Apartment properties faced significant uncertainty throughout 2020 because of the COVID-19 virus and the economic downturn that resulted. Job losses, eviction freezes, and the maddening politics surrounding economic aid created an uncertain environment for landlords and developers. That uncertainty, along with significant municipal and state-level delays in the entitlement process, pushed at least 900 planned units from 2020 construction into 2021.

Nonresidential/commercial construction saw sufficient improvement in the last months of 2020 to bring construction volume within shouting distance of $4 billion. The $3.923 billion in construction of commercial and nonresidential building structures was nearly $1 billion less than was forecast at the beginning of 2020; however, the final tally was more than 10 percent higher than mid-year predictions for activity.

The prospect of widespread vaccination by mid-year is giving owners a view to recovery and boosting activity. Architects and engineers are reporting increased billing and bidding. The Biden administration’s priorities and slim Congressional majorities increase the likelihood that a major infrastructure package will boost construction spending and hiring by spring. That, in turn, seems to have been an impetus for progress on several of the region’s major projects, including the Pittsburgh International Airport modernization, First National Bank’s new headquarters in the Lower Hill District, and UPMC Heart and Transplant Hospital. The region’s two major hospital systems, UPMC and Allegheny Health Network, have upped construction budgets for 2021 and the following years, which is a good leading indicator for the construction industry.

Highwoods Properties is presenting plans for its new 65,000 square foot East Liberty Centre office building to the Zoniong Hearing Board on Feb. 18. PJ Dick is the construction manager. The presentation can be viewed at the Zoning Hearing Board site. AHN selected Sentinel Construction as the CM for its new $10 million parking garage at the new Wexford hospital site in Pine Township.

Green Shoots of Recovery for Higher Education

Throughout the U.S. colleges and universities have become hot spots for new COVID-19 infections, often with numbers that are astronomical for the small towns in which the schools are located. After one month, however, returning to school has been less of a problem for the economy than was feared. This doesn’t mean we’re out of the woods, of course, but the outbreaks have so far been mostly confined to the campuses, rather than setting off big spikes in the college towns. Obviously, stay in touch with this issue as flu season begins.

This morning brought a report from the National Student Clearinghouse that was more good news for the higher ed market. The National Student Clearinghouse Research Center released a preliminary report on fall enrollment across the U.S. today and its results were better than expected. Colleges and universities have seen undergraduate enrollment decline 2.5% in fall compared to last year. Public 4-year schools were nearly even with 2019, and private non-profit schools were off 3.8%. One downside surprise was that community colleges saw a 7.5% decline. Community colleges were expected to get a bump because of the economic impact of the pandemic. Another troubling trend was the decline in foreign students. The pandemic, and its related travel restrictions, accelerated the declining foreign student enrollment to 11% in fall 2020. Only 22% of the colleges and universities reported in time for this update, so it is possible that these trends will see revisions by the time of the final report in late fall.

Source: National Student Clearinghouse

Pennsylvania institutions fared much worse than the nation as a whole, probably because of the predominance of private 4-year schools, with enrollments shrinking 9.2%. One national trend that is likely to hit Pittsburgh universities harder than most is the 11% drop in foreign students enrolled in U.S. colleges. Locally, Duquesne University was off very slightly, as an increase in graduate students virtually offset the drop in undergrad enrollment. The same trend boosted enrollment slightly higher at Slippery Rock and California University of PA. Local private colleges Point Park University and Grove City College both report that enrollment was lower but in line with 2019. Robert Morris University saw a decline of just under 10% but attributed that to an unusually large graduating class in 2019 and a significant drop in international students. Data on Pitt and CMU enrollments wasn’t available but, assuming enrollment declines were milder than expected there also, news is good for the many planned construction projects in Oakland.

In project news, JMC Holdings selected the PJ Dick/Dick Building Co. team as construction manager for the 1501 Penn Avenue office building, which is expected to advance in spite of rejection by the Pittsburgh Planning Commission. Another large redevelopment will be before the Zoning Board of Adjustment in October. Echo Realty’s Shady Hill mixed-use project, a demolition and redevelopment of the Shakespeare Street Giant Eagle in Shadyside, involves a new 36,000 square foot Giant Eagle and 38,000 square feet of retail, to be built by Continental Building Co., and a $10 million, 432-car garage that has been awarded to Carl Walker Construction. Shady Hill also includes a $37 million, 252-unit apartment being developed by Echo’s partner Greystar. Massaro Corp. is the contractor for the apartments.

Mele & Mele was low on the $25.7 million Canonsburg-Houston WWTP. Yarborough was low bidder on the $1.9 million Port Authority Manchester Garage engine test facility. Masco Construction was low on the $3.6 million Robinson Township Police Station. Sentinel Construction is about to start on an $8.7 million renovation of Seven Oaks Country Club in Beaver. Johnson Development has awarded a contract to Franjo Construction for the new $6 million, 105,000 square foot Cube Smart Self-Storage on the North Side. Franjo is also the contractor for a $3.2 million upgrade to Zamagias’ Shaler Plaza.The $67 million Canon McMillan Middle School is out to bid due Oct. 15. 

Some Random and Personal Observations

Jack Mascaro died on Sunday. There were few figures who played a bigger role in the construction industry in the era following the collapse of the steel industry than Jack did. His personality will be missed. I’ve done business with Mascaro Construction for 25 years now but didn’t get to know Jack until the time between selling Pittsburgh Construction News and starting the magazine BreakingGround. Over the past decade we became friends, working together every year or so on a project that he was pursuing (and for which he wanted some free information). I will miss getting those calls.

In his obituary there was mention of his starting his business in 1988 on the Ping Pong table in the basement of his Upper St. Clair home. This story is part of the Mascaro lore but it always makes me chuckle. Jack was proud of the humble beginnings story but he was anything but the kind of businessman who worked from his basement. Jack invested heavily in his people, his technology, his equipment, and his facilities. He didn’t do things on the cheap and he built a company that is one of the leaders of the construction industry. He was proud of that and of the fact that his three sons were trying to take the business to a higher level than he left it for them.

Jack was impatient. He was a ball buster. He didn’t like to lose, even in an industry where you lose way more opportunities than you win. And he had a high level of curiosity. Jack gave me a new book to read every time we met in his office. There was a lot more to Jack than I ever got to see but two stories stick in my mind when I think of how to describe Jack.

The first took place in 2006 or 2007, when we were first getting to know each other. One of his competitors had just landed a big job that he was competing to build. It was not the first big job the competitor had landed recently. My phone rang. Instead of hello, I heard Jack’s unmistakable high raspy voice asking me if [fill in the blank] “needs to win every [expletive deleted] job in Pittsburgh?!?” When I reminded him that the same competitor could have asked that question about Mascaro Construction just a few years before that, he laughed and said, “Well that was then. This is now.”

In 2018, Jack asked me for a bunch of data to try and understand an aspect of the market better for an idea he had to create a more competitive environment for the Laborers union. We had lunch at Legends of the North Shore. There was a server who would speak Italian with Jack so he could practice learning the language. Jack was really interested in digging into the data I pulled together for him, trying to see if it supported his idea and thinking about where his argument might be weak. All of this was after beating a bout with cancer into remission. I asked him why he was so concerned about the industry when he was technically retired from the operations. “I’m 73 years old. I’m just starting to get good at all of this,” he said.

I just turned 63. I try to think about that lunch when I feel tired of the day-to-day nonsense of running a business much smaller than Mascaro Construction. Jack left behind a great legacy. His sons, John, Jeffrey and Michael, care about Mascaro Construction and its people the way he did. His humor, passion, and curiosity left an imprint on an industry and a city. Alla prossima Jack.


Changing gears, Monday brought more great news about the progress towards a vaccine for COVID-19. The vaccine being developed by Oxford University and Asta Zeneca completed an early trial on 1,007 people and was found to be safe and to trigger the antibodies needed to fight the virus. This news follows last week’s announcement that the Moderna vaccine had been effective in triggering the defense antibodies in 100% of its trials and would go into large-scale human testing. The news is a reminder that the solution to the economic problems caused by the pandemic will be a medical solution. Until then, data is showing that people are going to avoid economic activities that expose them to the public, meaning that the recovery will be slow until the fear of transmission fades. Wash your hands. Stay six feet apart. Wear a mask.

In local construction news, Fay-Penn Economic Council announced the start of construction of a 100,500 square foot spec industrial building in Fayette Business Park in Georges Township south of Uniontown. Fairchance Construction is building it. Construction also started on the $20 million micro-grid project being developed by People Gas to power the Pittsburgh International Airport site. PJ Dick is the construction manager.

Where We Stand as We Move to Green

Southwestern PA went to green today and I’m getting a haircut. Seems like a good time to look at where the market is.

This morning the Bureau of Labor Statistics released its monthly Employment Situation Summary, which had some of the first good economic news since January. Employers re-hired enough laid-off workers to add a net 2.5 million jobs in May, bringing the unemployment rate down to 13.3%. That’s pretty consistent with the decrease of four million receiing unemployment insurance during the week ending May 23. The report followed on the heels of Thursday’s news that first-time unemployment claims “fell” to 1.88 million last week. Earlier this week payroll firm ADP reported that private employment declined 2.76 million in May, a significant improvement over April. The most significant information in this morning’s BLS report was the analysis of the unemployed from the past few months. The relevant paragraph from the summary is quoted below:

In May, the number of unemployed persons who were jobless less than 5 weeks decreased
by 10.4 million to 3.9 million. These individuals made up 18.5 percent of the
unemployed. The number of unemployed persons who were jobless 5 to 14 weeks rose by
7.8 million to 14.8 million, accounting for about 70.8 percent of the unemployed. The
number of long-term unemployed (those jobless for 27 weeks or more), at 1.2 million,
increased by 225,000 over the month and represented 5.6 percent of the unemployed.

The data shows the potential for strong recovery, providing that the news on the medical front remains positive. If economic activity were to return to 95% of GDP levels pre-COVID (a mark that would equal the output at the bottom of the financial crisis recession), unemployment should decline to 7-8%. That’s not a great economy but it is a vast improvement. Absent a medical solution to the virus, this outcome seems unlikely but the May data shows a possible path to a quick recovery. (That’s a scenario that seemed highly unlikely a month ago.) The risk in viewing this report as the start of a “V” shaped recovery is real, however. In the breakdown of industry-level hiring, the biggest gain was in hospitality (1,239,000), which remains mired in a deep slump from lack of demand. It’s likely that the bulk of the hiring in hospitality was the result of Payroll Protection, since we also know that demand for restaurants, hotels, and travel is off by 50-75%. The gains in construction and manufacturing (464,000 and 225,000 respectively) are more durable. Much of the economic activity that was lost since mid-March will be lost for 2020; however, the opportunity for a quicker-than-expected recovery exists if consumers and businesses did build reserves that can carry them into the late summer.

Yesterday’s extension of Payroll Protection Program benefits will help businesses stay afloat through the summer months and retain employees, which in turn provides income for rent, mortgage payments, and consumption. The INVEST Act, which was passed by the House of Representative Wednesday, also provides hope for the construction industry. INVEST authorizes infrastructure spending for the fiscal years 2021-2025. The $500 billion represents a 64% increase over the $305 billion authorized in the 2015 FAST Act. The authorization still has to pass the Senate.

Because of the lag in reporting, the data we have on the regional economy is not as sunny. The Department of Labor reported that unemployment jumped to 16.3% in metropolitan Pittsburgh during April. That tracks very closely with the expectations based upon U.S. data for April. It will take until mid-late July to see whether regional hiring picked back up in May to the same extent as the rest of the U.S. Construction data for the first five months in Pittsburgh suggests that nonresidential/commercial construction will fall below $2 billion for the first six months of 2020, a trend that indicates total construction in 2020 of less than $3.5 billion. That would be a decline of more than $1 billion from forecasts at the beginning of the year.

On June 1, Census Bureau reported on total U.S. construction spending. Because of its methodology, the spending looks much more optimistic than what is likely to be reality. AGC’s Ken Simonson points out that Census imputes a lot of modeling into its calculations in the absence of first-hand reporting from contractors, many of which did not report in April. He believes the actual totals will be much lower when revised in coming months.

Source: U.S. Census Bureau

Last week Pittsburgh’s Urban redevelopment Authority approved the Buccini Pollin plan for developing the 28-acre former Civic Arena site last week. The move cleared the path for the $200 million FNB Tower, which will be built by the PJ Dick/Mascaro/Massaro team. It was but one of several significant projects to move forward in the Hill. McAllister Equities is presenting its plans to the city for a $10 million, 51-unit apartment at 1717 Fifth Avenue. Franjo Construction is scheduled to start construction around August 1. The URA is publicizing the June 12 pre-bid meeting for the $10 million Granada Square redevelopment, a conversion of the Granada Theater in the Hill District into a 40-unit apartment built by Mistick Construction. Subcontractor/supplier bids are scheduled to be taken July 6. With the $450 million UPMC Mercy Vision & Rehabilitation Hospital underway, the Hill District is set to lead construction out of the recession caused by the coronavirus mitigation.

In other construction news, Mistick is also taking bids on the $16.5 millioin, 44-unit Jeremiah Village in Zelienople. PS Construction started work on $7.5 million build-out for medical marijuana facilities for CannTech in RIDC Thorn Hill. Sentinel Construction is working on a $1.4 million tenant improvement for Seneca Resources at 2000 Westinghouse Drive in Cranberry Township. Shannon Construction started work on an $800,000 TI for Matthews Marking Systems at Cranberry Business Park. A. Martini & Co. was successful on the new Chase Bank branch announced for Fox Chapel Road next to Fox Chapel Plaza. Charter Homes & Neighborhoods started work on the 26,000 square foot retail building at the Meeder Farm development in Cranberry Township that will include the Recon Brewery.

 

 

A Tale of Two Overlooked Trends

With two full months of pandemic mitigation under our belts, we are finally beginning to understand the secondary effects of the health crisis. Here are a couple of derivative financial impacts to consider. Unlike previous recessions, the peculiarities and uncertainty of the COVID-19 pandemic are creating unusual stresses on primary care medicine and bankruptcy. As the divergence grows between the health of the stock market and the health of the underlying economy, the shutdown is impacting each of these in an exceptional way.

The fact that there are likely to be a dramatic increase in bankruptcy filings is not unusual for the coronavirus-induced recession. Recessions create different winners and losers. Sometimes it’s just bad luck or timing for a firm that was doing well prior to a downturn. Regardless of the reasons, the steep reduction in business and disruption of credit that accompany recessions results in businesses having to declare bankruptcy. For many of those firms, the bankruptcy allows for reorganization and forbearance that leads to recovery, and ultimately to creditors being repaid. In many cases, the act of filing bankruptcy motivates creditors to reassess their positions and the bankruptcy is avoided altogether. Of course, a significant share of the bankruptcies filed during a recession is Chapter 7 filings, which result in liquidation.

This recession is causing a shakeup in the bankruptcy landscape and the pattern of financial distress is different from any post-World War II recession. One factor that leads to bankruptcy is corporate debt that can’t be paid. Coming into 2020, the levels of corporate debt held in speculative BBB or junk bonds were high, and the stress since then has elevated worries of default. As defaults increase, bonds will be further downgraded, meaning it will be harder for U.S. corporations to raise debt and more costly when they do.

One measure of this problem is the rise in distressed credits, or junk bonds with spreads that are ten points higher than the corresponding U.S. Treasury bonds. In other words, a distressed two-year corporate bond would yield 10.13% on May 20. Standard & Poors estimates that distressed credits as a share of junk bonds rose from 25% to 30% from March 16 to April 10. During that same period the default rate for junk bonds rose in the U.S. from 3.5% to 3.9%. Two-thirds of global defaults in April were by U.S. corporations. This is strong indicator of coming bankruptcies. Moody’s predicts that the global default rate for junk bonds will be twice the 10% rate that marked the financial crisis.

Should this trend play out to bring a steep rise in bankruptcy filings, another issue looms: inadequate bankruptcy court capacity. Courts are already stretched thin and the looming wave of bankruptcies threatens to overwhelm them. That would leave corporations and creditors floundering without resolution while the courts try to catch up.

These dynamics suggest that there will be an increase in pre-packaged bankruptcy agreements and other alternatives to dissolution. Unlike in 2009, liquidity is not a problem in capital markets. There has been dramatic growth in private equity rescue funds. Viable companies should be able to access credit to survive the business disruption or to negotiate satisfactory payments and refinance debt with creditors. But the peculiar nature of this recession makes it almost impossible to determine corporate value. That makes it tough to assign share prices for investors in exchange for equity, or to determine credit worthiness when there are limited revenues, cash flow and view to the future of the market.

Solutions to these challenges for bankruptcy and debt refinancing could keep businesses from closing their doors in the coming months.

The plight of hospitals during the pandemic has been well-documented. What has received less attention is the financial stress of the healthcare system’s foundational element, the personal care physician (PCP).

Mitigation measures in all states included avoidance of doctors’ offices for anything other than emergency or necessary visits. That has resulted in a massive loss in revenues for PCP practices across the U.S. Physicians switched gears fairly adroitly as the virus spread, moving quickly to telemedicine as a way to treat many patients; however, fees for telemedicine appointments are lower, as are reimbursements. Compounding the revenue problem are the delays in getting reimbursements from insurers during the shutdown and the delays in billing from the more limited staffing in PCP offices.

Losing PCP practices, either to closing doors or mergers with large practices, will be bad for healthcare consumers. If there are fewer PCPs competition is reduced, raising prices. In areas that are already underserved by PCPs, consolidation will just broaden these healthcare deserts. Losing more density of healthcare providers will reduce the number of referrals to specialists. More people will put off treating nagging ailments and chronic conditions if the PCP office is inconvenient. That will result in higher hospital admissions and escalating costs of treatment for serious conditions that could have been treated cheaper at an earlier stage.

The problems facing primary care and bankruptcy are downstream from the obvious healthcare and economic crisis. But they represent systemic weaknesses that will present challenges that are mostly unforeseen now.

Innovation Research Tower at Fifth & Halket. Image courtesy Walnut Capital.

Some construction news: PBX is reporting that the $55 million Evans City Elementary School is out to bid due June 19. Continental Building Co. is taking bids for the $12 million North Shore Lot 10 445-car parking garage on May 27. Rycon Construction was selected as CM for the $25 million redevelopment of the former Sears Outlet on 51st Street. Construction will resume on the $80 million, 280,000 square foot Innovation Research Center in Oakland being developed by Walnut Capital and built by PJ Dick Inc.

Second Phase of Major AHN Construction Project Nearly Complete

Second Phase of Major AHN Construction Projects Nearly Complete
Second Phase of Major AHN Construction Projects Nearly Complete

Allegheny Health Network, much like their latest business partners UPMC, have kept busy in recent years with commercial real estate purchases and developments. One of these development projects is a new emergency department in the Jefferson Hospital in Jefferson HIlls, PA. This project is just one of multiple renovations and new construction projects currently underway under the Allegheny Health Network Banner. Today, we will review the details of the AHN Jefferson Hospital project, discuss some other recent AHN commercial real estate deals, and end with how these projects might impact CRE in our local Pittsburgh region.

Details on the Jefferson Hospital Expansion Project

Details on the Jefferson Hospital Expansion Project

According to Commercial Property Executive: “Highmark Health and Allegheny Health Network have completed Phase I of the new emergency department of AHN Jefferson Hospital in Jefferson Hills, Pa. The project cost $21 million and expanded the existing facility by 34,000 square feet. During the renovations, the hospital’s helipad was also relocated to the roof of the structure. Phase II, which is expected to complete in May 2020, will consist of modernizing the current emergency department space.”

The AHN Jefferson Hospital is home to nearly 400 doctors covering over 40 areas of practice. The new emergency department will consist of:

  • 44 private treatment and observation rooms
  • 7 central nursing pods
  • A more modern and spacious triage area focused on privacy
  • Advance CT and x-ray capabilities
  • Trauma rooms
  • Rooms specially designed for behavior health assessments and treatments

The AHN Jefferson hospital currently cares for over 50,000 patients in the Lower Mon Valley and South Hills areas. This latest round of renovations comes on the heels of a $17.5 million investment into a new surgical suite.

Recent Allegheny Health Network CRE Investments

Recent Allegheny Health Network CRE Investments

While the AHN Jefferson Hospital upgrades are ongoing, they are certainly part of a larger effort being put forth by AHN to modernize and invest in their medical facilities. Here are some other recent examples.

AHN Constructing Harmar Hospital

AHN broke ground on a new Harmer Hospital location on October 5, 2018. The site is still under construction, but is expected to open this fall. Construction on the site was delayed for six months, but kicked back into full gear in July of 2019. The new Harmar Hospital will be located at the intersection of Freeport Road and Guys Run Road, near Zone 28 (formerly Fun Fest). The site will operate as an emergency hospital with additional services including imaging, inpatient care, and a multitude of lab tests.

AHN Construction on New Wexford Hospital

As of October 24, 2019, the final beam was put into place for the brand new AHN Wexford Hospital. The 160-bed hospital is expected to open in 2021. According to Cynthia Hundorfean, AHN CEO and President, “When Wexford Hospital opens its doors, it will be the most technologically advanced and patient-centric acute care hospital in western Pennsylvania.” The hospital is being built in response to the rapid growth in Pine Township and the surrounding areas.

AHN Waterworks Outpatient Center

On a smaller scale, Allegheny Health Network has also committed time and resources into developing outpatient centers for local residents. The most recent of these investments went into the AHN Waterworks Outpatient Center. The center employees ~35 workers, and includes:

  • Gynecologist/obstetrician appointments with full ultrasound capabilities
  • Orthopedic care provided by Allegheny Orthopedic Associates
  • Primary care for adults and children
  • Cardiology care including echograms
  • Diagnostics services including blood tests, MRI, CT scans, 3-D mammography, and more
  • Express care service for non-emergency healthcare with no appointment necessary

How Medical Construction Impacts Western PA Commercial Real Estate

How Medical Construction Impacts Western PA Commercial Real Estate

Allegheny Health Network has been investing heavily into the local community, but how does that impact the local Pittsburgh commercial real estate market? While the full breadth of these major CRE investments is far reaching, here are a few primary takeaways:

Investment in local healthcare drives the local economy. It is well documented that greater healthcare investments lead to greater economic health. This has been shown to be true on both large and small scales. As AHN and UPMC continue to invest and improve our local healthcare resources, the population gets healthier, jobs are created, and the overall quality of life improves. This creates a stronger economy which in turn has a positive impact on commercial real estate in the area.

Greater healthcare services serve our aging population. Pennsylvania, like much of the US, has an aging population. As a greater percentage of our local population is 65 plus, the need for healthcare services increases. AHN investing in hospitals and outpatient centers allows the aging population to remain in their current areas. This increases the demand for housing, retail locations, and commercial real estate overall.

AHN is choosing to renovate defunct retail locations. On a more specific note, AHN and other local healthcare providers have been more willing to renovate/repurpose spaces in dead malls and other retail locations. This could be great news for CRE investors sitting on vacant retail spaces. At the end of the day, any CRE investments from our regional healthcare networks should be a shot in the arm to the commercial real estate market overall.

Construction Underway at Beaver Valley Mall

Recently, we discussed what commercial real estate investors were doing to solve the problem of America’s dead malls. As part of that article, one of the solutions which have effectively brought life back to struggling retail real estate is to invest in renovations or other related construction projects. The Beaver Valley Mall in Beaver County, PA has recently broken ground on a new construction effort. If successful, this revitalization could be a blueprint for other dying malls in the Western PA region.

Today, we will review some highlights of the Beaver Valley Mall, discuss the details of the newest construction project, and how this project might impact the local commercial real estate landscape.

CBRE Heads New Strip Mall Construction at the Beaver Valley Mall

Funded by commercial real estate giant CBRE, plans to redevelop a now-defunct Macy’s location are underway at the Beaver Valley Mall. The former site of a Macy’s megastore will be turned into a mini strip mall. This is part of a plan to redevelop large retail locations that were struggling in the region. This new mini strip mall is to be named The Shops at Beaver Valley Mall. JJO Construction started work on the first building in the fall of 2019.

As reported by timesonline.com: “The Shops at Beaver Valley Mall, which will include about 50,000 square feet of retail, office and service space with mall access available in various sizes. According to a CBRE press release, there will be nearly 27,000 square feet of retail space facing Brodhead Road. The Shops at Beaver Valley Mall will join other anchor tenants, such as JCPenney, Dick’s Sporting Goods, U-Haul, Rural King, Planet Fitness and Boscov’s.”

This is not the first renovation and/or construction effort that has recently taken place at the Beaver Valley Mall. Recent construction updates for restaurants and entertainment venues including escape rooms have been part of the shift away from large retail locations and towards smaller, more profitable business partners.

Beaver Valley Mall History and Current Climate

Beaver Valley Mall is located less than an hour north of downtown Pittsburgh. The location first opened in 1970 and boasts over 100 individual stores, a gym, restaurants, and is getting more involved in the entertainment space. Beaver Valley Mall is also dedicated to offering free programs and events for local community members and their families.

As with many American malls, Beaver Valley Mall enjoyed financial success through partnership with anchor tenants including JCPenney, Gimbels, The Joseph Horne Company, and Sears. The location of this latest construction, a now-empty Macy’s, is just one example of these retail giants struggling in the 21st century. Sears and Macy’s locations closed in 2016 and 2017 respectively.

Despite all of the hyperbole surrounding the detail of traditional retail, many malls remain successful. Recent history has shown that successful malls have been willing to make updates to both their facilities and their business model. With the recent backing of CBRE, Beaver Valley Mall is looking towards the future.

Following the Beaver Valley Mall Template

As a continuation of this point, Beaver Valley Mall is by no means in a unique situation. Other large, local malls such as Ross Park Mall, Monroeville Mall, and The Pittsburgh Mills, are all in relatively similar situations. In particular, the Galleria at the Pittsburgh Mills has an uncertain future. Despite promises by Mason Asset Management that renovations were high on the priority list, no action has yet been taken.

The four most recent tenants of the Pittsburgh Mills: Allegheny Health Network Citizens’ School of Nursing, Focus on the Arts, Chicken Connection, and Himalayan Salts Co, tell the story of a shift away from large retailers and towards alternative mall tenants. Many Western PA malls are considering what these new tenants might require from an infrastructure perspective.

Beaver Valley Mall is amongst the local commercial real estate leaders investing significant capital into their retail facilities. With backing from a well-financed organization such as CBRE and a commitment to investing in the space, local commercial real estate professionals and residents will be watching how this new construction effort pays dividends.

Going Forward

As all commercial real estate professionals know, there is not much room for waiting in this industry. As the retail space continues to evolve, so too will commercial real estate investors’ mindsets about malls and other large spaces. The process of revitalizing America’s dead malls is already well underway. In the local Western PA area, it remains to be seen which malls will be able to successfully adapt to a changing retail reality. The truth likely lies somewhere in between exaggerated reports of the demise of traditional retail and the rosy reports of modern retail evolutions.

The mall industry will need to adapt to changing consumer behaviors. Beaver Valley Mall is using a now-defunct mega-retail location as an opportunity to develop a location for multiple, smaller, more profitable tenants. Whether this investment will pay dividends remains to be seen. In either case, the success or failure of mall renovation projects will inform future decisions in our area.

Renovations have Brought the US Steel Tower Back to Prominence in Pittsburgh

The US Steel Tower, also referred to as the Steel Building and the USX Tower, has been a trademark of the Pittsburgh skyline since its construction was completed in 1970. The building is now also known as the UPMC building, and has a long history of importance to the Pittsburgh people, identity, and economy. Recent renovations have breathed new life into the now 50-year-old building. Office spaces in Pittsburgh have become more decentralized in recent years with tech companies like Google and Uber electing to headquarter outside downtown offices.

With all of this in mind, today we will review the recent work being done on the US Steel building and what impact this might have on the building itself and downtown as a whole.

Details of Steel Tower Renovations

Although there is no onset of renovations, the US Steel Tower has undergone some major facelifts in the past months and years which will be noticeable to regulars in the area. Here are some of the highlights:

The US Steel Tower is now the second-largest LEED Silver Certified office building in the world

LEED stands for Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design. While the US Steel Building may be thought of as a 50-year-old dinosaur, it is likely the most economically and technologically advanced building in downtown Pittsburgh. This is thanks to recent renovations aimed at efficiency and eco-friendliness.

The US Steel Tower renovations modernized the infrastructure

As a continuation of the above, the US Steel Tower has implemented a number of modern changes that improve cost and environmental inefficiencies. Modern renovations/improvements include retrofitting water supplies, sustainable energy practices, offering alternative transportation services, installing eco-friendly LED lights, installing eco-friendly HVAC products, and much more.

US Steel Building has renovated office spaces

As part of UPMC moving in, several large renovations took place to the office amenities of the US Steel Building. These renovations included:

  • Renovation of seven (7) full floors of office space to be used for UPMC headquarters
  • Changing cubicle like layouts to more modern designs including high-end, high-tech offices and support areas
  • Updates to the 60th floor “Center for Connected Medicine (CCM)”
  • Overall renovations to existing workspaces and offices

These renovations covered a total of 185,000 square feet over 11 months and were all part of the LEED silver certification process.

Pittsburgh Steel Building Facts

To understand why renovations of the US Steel Building are so significant to the local Pittsburgh economy and atmosphere, let’s look at some quick facts on the building itself.

  • The US Steel Building stands at approximately 841 feet tall, making it the 66th tallest building in the United States.
  • Those 841 feet are spread across 64 floors, which are mostly comprised of office space.
  • The single floor area equals 41,163 square feet, which is only ~2,000 square feet shy of a full acre.
  • The facilities include a 2,900,000 square foot grass area which is used as a local park for the public.
  • The US Steel Tower underbelly holds a three-level parking garage which can accommodate 700 cars.
  • The building holds 11,000 windows, 54 elevators, and boasts a massive lobby area with full amenities

List of Recent US Steel Tower Updates

In a five year period, over $60 million was invested into the US Steel Building in total renovations with no end date in sight. These changes include:

  • Lobby updates including renovations to many interior businesses
  • The addition of two (2) garage elevators
  • Newly installed brick and granite in the plaza area
  • A new fire alarm and security system
  • A new tenant and building sprinkler system
  • Renovated restroom facilities
  • Energy-efficient upgrades (as mentioned above) including closed water loops, HVAC upgrades, energy-efficient light installations, and more
  • Improved facilities to comply and exceed the American with Disabilities Act (ADA) requirements
  • New infrastructure including improved electric distribution panels and “base building mechanical improvements”

Going Forward

For those of us native to Pittsburgh, the US Steel Tower is probably the building we think of when we think of the downtown area. While the name and ownership may have changed hands, the importance of this structure remains. Recent renovations have improved both the work lives of the office tenants within and the amenities for the public passing through the building for a bite to eat or just to take in the sights. With major backers including CBRE and Jamestown L.P., it is likely that we will continue to see investments being made into the tallest and most historic Pittsburgh skyscraper.